I am now a fellow of the Humanities Research Institute at Buckingham University, which has given me the opportunity to teach a philosophy MA by thesis, the details of which can be found here.

Buckingham is a unique institution, probably the least politically correct university in Europe, and one that is organized more or less entirely on business principles, paying people like me according to their success in attracting students. Its Chancellor, Lady Keswick, and Vice-Chancellor, Sir Anthony Seldon, have both distinguished themselves in other careers, the first in politics, the second as Head Master of Wellington College. Founded by Margaret Thatcher, Buckingham was at first more a business school than a fully developed university. Now it has a growing and successful humanities faculty, and takes advantage of the Charter which some neglectful bureaucrat allowed it to obtain in order to validate degrees at both undergraduate and postgraduate level. It is expanding its presence in London, with the use of a building in Gower Street and the possibility of obtaining a permanent home in the centre, within mortar range of the BBC. My own course takes place in a private dining room at a London Club, where the students can enjoy discussion and wine over dinner, supplemented by private tutorials leading to a written thesis on a topic agreed between us. This return to civilised teaching, of people who are really interested in learning, has been a refreshing experience for me, and the success of the first year has encouraged me to offer the course again for the year to come.

Similar MA courses, taught in London, are available, in the following subjects and the Fellows of the Humanities Research Institute are listed here, including many well-known names. Voted University of the year for Teaching Quality by The Times & The Sunday Times, and enjoying a growing reputation among leftist professor paralytic with fury over its existence Buckingham is setting the agenda for higher education in a society that would otherwise be very soon without one.

 

Latest Articles

Diary, The Spectator 20.4.19

Roger Scruton: Should I forgive the journalist that got me fired? Sunday, 7th April 2019. Travelling back from London with the St Matthew Passion filling my head, after the moving...

Notre Dame de Paris

Le Figaro 17/04/2019 Sometimes I stay on the Isle de la cité, in an apartment borrowed from a friend. From the kitchen window I look out across rooftops to the solemn...

After my own dark night

The Telegraph 20 April 2019 Fully to understand the Easter story it helps to be hounded by the mob, to know that nothing that you say or do can deflect...

An Apology for thinking - 11 April 19 - The Spectator

The Spectator, 11 April 2019 I recently gave an interview to the New Statesman, on the assumption that, as the magazine’s former wine critic I would be treated with respect, and...

Recent Books

Souls in the Twilight

Beaufort Books  (October 2018) As the lights that have guided us go out, people begin to wander in the twilight, seeking their place of belonging. In these stories, set in...

Music as an Art

Bloomsbury  (August 2018) Music as an Art begins by examining music through a philosophical lens, engaging in discussions about tonality, music and the moral life, music and cognitive science and German...

Where We Are: The State of Britain Now

Where We Are: The State of Britain Now

Bloomsbury (November 2017) Addressing one of the most politically turbulent periods in modern British history, philosopher Roger Scruton asks how, in these circumstances, we can come to define our identity,...

2019 Events

Wed 31st Jul - Fri 9th Aug - 2019 Scrutopia Summer School

Thur 29th Aug - Sun 1st Sept - Scrutopia Alumni Meeting 

Fri 26 - Sat 27th April - CRASSH conference, Cambridge

Sat 15th June - Philosophy Day

Thurs 19th Sept - ISI Gala for Western Civilization, Philadelphia

Tues 14th May - National Planning Summit, London